Fiio FH5- Roundup Review

Are you annoying to google the Fiio FH5 review and read them everywhere ? 

If yes, you are at the right place. 

Following you can find all the reviews of Fiio FH5, including the article review and Youtube video review.  

Note: Xtenik just collected all the summary from other sites, if you want to read the full review, just click the button, it will redirect you to the original article. 

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Article Review 

Headfonia Review 

Build

FiiO got this one right. The IEM feels very robust in hand, and I think it should be a reliable item for extensive usage. The whole body is made from an aluminum-magnesium alloy. The face plates are closed with multiple screws inside. The chassis is tooled with a 5-axis CNC machine. So everything is beautiful and complete, and you can clearly see and feel the difference between the FH5 and FiiO’s previous offerings.

The cable is named as “LC-3.5B” and you can purchase it separately if you want. It’s quite thick and sturdy but not very practical to me. It’s not as flexible as I would have liked, and it feels a notch heavier, compared to their other cables. The cable is made from silver plated copper wires and they’re coated with a transparent TPU material.

I really liked the build of the 3.5 mm L – type jack and the overall build of the cable, but maybe they could’ve used a thinner and more flexible one. Yet, it’s still a tremendously durable cable, at least that’s how it looks to me.

Fit

The FiiO FH5 has a great shape for most ears out there. It’s quite round, like the previous models, but the difference is that this design provides a fuller fit. The fit is more complete and ergonomic for a Universal IEM. It’s not fiddly anymore, it instead sits flush in your ears and it feels much more secure.

The supplied tips work very well. I chose the silicone ones, despite me usually liking the foam tips more. That’s because the IEM fits very well and I don’t have to use the foam tips to get a flush & secure fit. The silicone tips do the trick and they’re enough to give you a nice isolation. You can opt for foams to get more isolation though.

The IEM also feels quite comfortable and I did not feel any pressure with it. The isolation is not the best but still good.

Headfonics Review 

Sound Impressions

Tonality & Presentation

The FH5 is not quite what I would define as a V-Shape because of that additional mid-range BA driver FiiO have stuck in. It makes a bit of a difference. This is more of a “W-shape” with a solid emphasis on sub-bass and vocals presence as well as a gentle peak and lift in the mid to upper treble.

The presentation for me is relatively balanced sounding on the whole with a tonality that is a little north of neutral in terms of warmth but otherwise quite natural sounding. At its high point, there is around an 8dB difference between the sub-bass peak around 50Hz and the most recessed part of the response curve at around 600-800HZ or the lower midrange.

The upper mids where the FR elevation is most prominent with a 10dB difference between it and the lower mids with a minor drop into the lower treble. The 7k bump on the FH5 is not overly prominent either but just enough so some perceptible clarity and contrast with the low-end warmth. Hence that relative balance I was talking about initially in the presentation description.

Staging

Staging on the FH5 has a bit more depth over height but it is not by any means a dark presentation. There is enough headroom and air, however, the upper treble presence is on the polite and relaxed side beyond 9-10k.

The FH5 is not particularly wide sounding but it images well, much better than the F9 Pro’s diffuse and vague mids. That midrange bump from 1-3k does push vocals and percussion presence fairly far forward. However, the lower mids dip keeps instrumental timbre a little leaner and cleaner as well as positioning them a little behind vocals preventing the staging from sounding congested.

Bass

The FH5 is more sub-bass than mid-bass focused with a peak of around 30-50Hz and then a slow but steady drop by around 8db into the lower mids around 600-800Hz. Mid-bass has some nice warmth but it plays second fiddle to the dynamic driver’s sub-bass presence and power.

However, FiiO’s low-end tuning of the FH5 is more tasteful than overpowering. It is unmistakably a dynamic driver with that slightly slower pace and natural levels of decay. Compared to a quad-BA driver low-end equivalents such as the Noble Savanna, the FH5 bass performance is much more visceral, denser and definitely more powerful sounding.

Mids

Mids on the FH5 is characterized by a fairly steep bump from 1-3k and a dip from around 600-800Hz. You will get a very forward upper mids presence on the FH5 by up to 10dB and vocals, especially mid to higher pitched, will sound very forward and intimate.

Instrumental timbre is slightly north of neutral in terms of warmth but not overly rich and thick sounding. Positioning, particularly for lower midrange pitched instruments is a little behind the vocal presence so they are not in your face. Higher pitched instruments such as tambourines and cymbal work are much more forward and lively sounding. However, a slight FR dip post 3k to 5k keeps them from sounding splashing or abrasive.

The better vocal positioning also makes the FH5 much more amenable to pop and rock female vocals than the F9 Pro which sounded far more dipped and more suited to genres such as EDM which focus on treble and low-end impact. 

Head-fi Review 

Testing Methodology 

As a general method in reviewing products, I listen to equipments with many other devices, and then try to reach an “overall performance of the product”.

The different sources I used for listening to FH5 contain Fiio’s own X3 3rd Gen. Aune M1S, Hifiman SuperMini, Sony WM1A, ZX100, A45 Walkmans, and my trustworthy JDS Labs OL DAC + Objective2 combo. I also tested FH5’s performance over half a bunch of smartphones.

I listened to FH5 with Fiio X3 and Aune M1S through both balanced and single-ended outputs of these devices. Other listening sessions were carried single ended. As cables, I very much liked to try Fiio’s new, performance series cables of LC-B and (especially) LC-C through balanced connection, yet they were unavailable for my purchase at the 10-day-period I had FH5 with me. So in addition to the included 3.5mm cable (LC-3.5B) I bought and used Ibasso’s CB12s ($99) and CB13 ($199).

For listening material, I throw in a large group of testing tracks of different musical genres ranging from well-recorded / well-mastered / well-encoded tracks (like the Brothers of Arms (1985) album of Dire Straits in DSD128) with natural dynamic ranges to ones very inferior and even problematic on these aspects (like Muse’s Absolution (2003)).

I also used tracks encoded in lossless formate, containing very high levels of musical data (even on RedBook audio with 16 bits of resolution) and then compress them to low bitrate mp3 to see how much of this “sonic downgrade” i.e. the data loss in music would be reflected to my ears by FH5.

This can be considered as a general resolution / forgivingness test.

Headphonesty Review 

One of my favourite movie phrases come from Kingsman, a Colin Firth starrer about gentlemanly conduct, where he says (in between bashing bad guys really hard), “manners maketh man”. So, well, packaging maketh earphones. How you present yourself to someone new can mean the difference between a future lifelong partnership or being shown the door.

Since IEMs can’t really say “pardon me, miss”, a presentable appearance is the next best approximate. FiiO’s previous release FH1 had rudimentary packaging befitting an entry-level product, but here we see a huge step up. FH5’s packaging positively glows and demands attention. Not just a big box, like many life lessons we’ve learnt, it’s what inside that counts.

Stuff and Ear-Stuffers

As you open the book-like casing, the FH5 stares back at you, a specimen of beauty and splendour, adorned with gold trim and matching cables. Nothing says “touch me” more than this. But easy tiger, we have more to uncover. Underneath, a host of eartips with different sound properties await, for vocal lovers, bass addicts, balanced nuts, and um, some foam tips for treble-haters perhaps.

As with the FH1, a lovely Pelican-like case is provided, only now in transparent as opposed to the glossy black of old. Something tells me FiiO couldn’t wait to show off the FH5 at every opportunity. I have already extolled my love for the case in the FH1 review, but let me repeat it in simplified form. I love it, adore it, and would trade less-familiar family members for it given half a chance.

As I start a third consecutive paragraph with the same word, rounding out the accessory set is a fabric zippered pouch and a cleaner tool. The pouch is more pocketable than the hard case but sans protection, I wouldn’t use it but then again that’s why we have options. The cleaner tool is for, well, ear gunk in the sound bores. Do keep your ears clean.

Theheadphonelist Review 

Sound –

Tonality –

The FH5 is a W-shaped earphone, forgoing the brighter sound of the F9 earphones and instead adopting the fuller and more bass-focused voicing of the cheaper FH1 before it. What makes the FH5 quite interesting is its combination of a natural, often surprisingly close to neutral tone set to a very smooth, dense midrange. It achieves this not through enhancing the bass or lower-midrange but through sharp attenuation just before the lower-treble combined with a focus on sub over mid-bass; so its tone is not especially warm. A notable centre midrange bump redeems vocal presence in the face of its slightly more energetic lower-treble and voluminous sub-bass thereby producing a sound that is very engaging but also relatively balanced overall.

Ear Tips –

The FH5 includes 4 types of ear tips that slightly alter the sound to user taste. The vocal tips offer a slightly brighter sound, delivering greater upper-midrange and lower-treble presence. This bolsters clarity and also detail presence, however, the tips are actually less detailed as treble becomes slightly more brittle. Meanwhile, the bass tips offer quite the opposite effect, offering a darker, warmer sound by attenuating the higher frequencies, chiefly, the upper-midrange. The foam tips also offer a slightly warmer sound, treble is further attenuated and bass becomes a touch soft and congested. They aren’t ideal sonically but do aid isolation and fit so they have a purpose. All sound comments are using the balanced tips that I found to offer the most versatile presentation.

 Bass –

Sub-bass drives the FH5’s low-end with fairly large emphasis before sloping gradually downwards into a lightly attenuated lower-midrange. Combined with its stronger extension, the FH5 digs deep, delivering bold rumble and great slam and power. Mid-bass is lightly elevated, creating enlarged yet natural notes without introducing obvious bloat and warmth. On the flipside, upper-bass is quite neutral if not slightly attenuated, preventing over-warming and congestion while aiding bass/midrange separation.

Low-end notes are characterised by their smooth texture, a by-product of the FH5’s slightly slower decay. Notes don’t linger to congestion, however, bass isn’t especially fast. Still, the FH5 represents a clear step up from the more mid-bass focused F9 and FH1, sounding considerably cleaner. The FH5 does demonstrate good control and retrieves plenty of detail considering its fuller tuning. Listeners used to BA earphones may expect greater definition, however, the FH5 is an earphone that ultimately focusses on sub-bass power and a natural tone over speed and micro-detail.

Pocnetwork Review 

Performance

When it comes to performance, these headphones have a lot of versatility. This is something you would normally expect when buying into this level of a product. Dialing in the sound with the right tips is more important with these buds than your normal consumer product since it is more than just about a tight but comfortable fit. It is also about what your ears want to ear. They aren’t going to replace running the buds through an EQ of course, but their effect is quite noticeable and helps in shaping these to “you”.

Sound quality heavily depends on how you attach the tips as well. You can’t slide them on too far else you will lose a LOT of the range, including most of the lows. So you have to ride the tips on the rib going around the stem just right. I only point this out since it is easy to slide them beyond that little rib, and then you won’t have a right seal in your ears.

With the tips installed right, you can get a decent amount of range and even bass from these. The highs are incredibly clear, the mids have a nice range as well. Bass is the only thing you have to play with if you want more presence within the lower range of frequencies. For this, it depends heavily on what is driving the headphones. The tips make a difference, but the difference is minimal in comparison to that.

When you are able to bring out the lower frequencies, the lows are profound yet balanced. It’s not over boomy or anything and the lows can get deep and, well, low (hitting as low as 15Hz). For an example, listening to something like Brahms Academic Festival Overture (in C, OP) helps to highlight this with its huge bass drum. However, you have to find your way to these lows to experience that.

We found that these buds sound great with any mobile device (phones, tablets, laptops, etc). However, they shine best when paired with an amp. Pairing them with something like FiiO’s M9 Hi-Res Portable Player or the Dragonfly USB DAC (via a computer), or Creative’s Super X-Fi USB DAC, is going to bring out a fantastic range to them and great volume levels. Overall, the range is pretty balanced, although the lows aren’t always as powerful as the rest.

However, they sound amazing with a more powerful amp, like a nice tube amp such as the Little Dot MKII or something like the Marantz HD-DAC1. This is where you can bring out the best in the lows along with everything else, making for a perfect balanced blend to everything.

For an even bigger emphasis on bass when you are watching videos/movies, as well as an added value of “fun”, use the Creative Super X-Fi amp with Super X-Fi mode (virtual 7.1 sound stage) enabled, which can give these a huge presence and deep low frequencies. They also sound pretty good within the virtual surround sound stage it creates in general. You will find yourself playing around with some of the profiles to get it right, but the end result is fantastic.

The only disadvantages in this setup is that sometimes the bass can sound a little overly boomy in a few scenarios (depending on what you are listening to). This however, is the optimal setup for listening to the before mentioned Brahms Academic Festival Overture.

Headphone Guru

The FiiO brand is really synonymous with high bang-for-buck value in the personal audio world. For many people, FiiO is a launching pad – the first “audiophile” amp or DAC they ever own. For me personally, it was the FiiO E6 – just a tiny little pocket amp that was supposed be an improvement relative to my phone’s headphone jack. Viola, my first dedicated headphone amp!. I would later pick up the E17 amp/DAC, the E09K amplifier, X3 II DAP and finally X5 III DAP. For the most part all of these products shined at their price point.

In recent years, FiiO has been working to expand their portfolio to include a wide range of IEMs. The new FH5 ($259) is their most ambitious design to date, and has taken the place of the flagship in their growing lineup.

The FH5 is a 4-driver hybrid design with a 10mm polymer nanocomposite dynamic driver handling the low frequencies, a Knowles ED30262 balanced armature handing the midrange, and a pair of Knowles 31082 balanced armatures to handle the treble and ultra high frequency treble. These are contained in a beautiful precision-machined alloy shell that offers one of the best ergonomic fits of any universal shell I’ve encountered (more on that later).

Moonstar Review 

Design, Build Quality and Fit:

The Fiio FH5 has a very nice looking unique design that gives you a nice impression. The rare monitor housing has a patented “TRISHELL” structural design, made of a 5-axis CNC machined aluminum-magnesium material.

The faceplate (front cover) is fixed (according to Fiio) tightly together with multiple screws to the rare body to reduce resonance and distortion. The faceplate of the FH5 continuous Fiio’s design language that you can find on the Fiio F9 and F9 Pro, which looks like a see shell.

The Monitor is in grey color with exception of the golden frame on the front surface that gives the FH5 a premium feel.

The faceplate (front cover) is fixed (according to Fiio) tightly together with multiple screws to the rare body to reduce resonance and distortion. The faceplate of the FH5 continuous Fiio’s design language that you can find on the Fiio F9 and F9 Pro, which looks like a see shell.

The Monitor is in grey color with exception of the golden frame on the front surface that gives the FH5 a premium feel.

Audiofool Reviews

Unboxing / Packaging:

Those with other Flagship FiiO products will recognize the black box design as it seems to be used in all of their high-end models. The box has a slip cover over a book-fold design that is a step above previous models like my F9 pro as the internals are better laid out and allow for easy access to and organization of the accessories. The inner compartment is two layers deep with the headphones sitting on top with the cable in the shape a FiiO’s trademark heart with the remainder of the accessories hiding beneath.

Accessories:

Under the earphone tray, the space is divided in half. At the top is a small packet containing the manual and warrantee cards with the tips in their own foam tray beneath that. A total of 12 different tips are provided, 9 silicone of 3 different types and 3 foams. Small, medium, and large tips of each type are provided with the medium standard tip being installed on the earpieces and the remaining 11 stored in the foam tray. The only drawback is if one wishes to use the large standard tips and place the mediums in the tray, the cutout is slightly too large and the mediums will fall out unlike any of the others which are held well. This is the one oversight in an otherwise well designed tip management system.

The lower portion of the box contains the hard case, a clear pelican style case this time instead of the smoked version of the F9 pro. Inside the hard case is a soft case and a cleaning tool to round out the kit. The only real disappointment here was after purchasing the F9 pro, I had hope the FH5 would also ship with a balanced cable as the F9 did. No such luck this time so those wanting the balanced cable will need to order one separately.

Hifihelper Review 

DESIGN AND BUILD QUALITY

Regarding the design, the FH5 is very well built and designed with comfort in mind. The build quality is impressive and the provided cable is removable and high quality (something you might normally expect as an upgraded option).

It has a hybrid design where each channel uses one 10mm dynamic driver and three knowles balanced armature drivers.

The cable has in-line control, is 1.2m long and terminates in a single 3.5mm right-angle, gold-plated plug. The left and right channel are completely insulated from one another which I think is an excellent decision to do with the cable. Just make sure that if you end up exchanging your cable that you make sure the left and right earphone units match the corresponding cables you’ll be using.

The ear hooks and cable are easy to take off. Be sure to refer to the instruction booklet provided on how to do this in order to help make sure you don’t damage the cable. There’s not a lot of memory in them but that ends up being just fine, and I actually prefer it this way.

The slider on the cable is very stable and easy to keep in place. You don’t have to worry about it moving around unless you intentionally want to adjust or slide it.

These have an impedance of 19 ohms so you can certainly use and power these with a smartphone if you like.

Headmania Review 

Tests and Impressions

For the tests I have used FiiO Q5 with AM3A balanced amplification module. I have tested both single ended and balanced output. The first thing I noticed was that the single ended output sounded dryer, flatter with less details, bass depth and less holographic soundstage.

I also tried them from my Oneplus 5 phone. I am actually aiming for my future new in ear headphones to sound good even from my phone for the moments I forget to take my Chord Mojo or other portable player.

I was pleasantly surprised to see that they sounded quite nice from my Oneplus 5. Considering the high sensitivity of FH5, I was surprised to see I didn’t get any hiss or noise with Oneplus 5, while with FiiO Q5 I did have a slight hiss noise.

Of course, the level of detail, control and focus is better on FiiO Q5, but the sound quality was quite nice directly from the phone output as well.

I also wanted to test them with my Chord Mojo, but I am waiting to replace the battery, since the original one is dead now.

Edit:

I have managed to test FH5 with two more devices: FiiO Dragonfly Red and Aune B1 Class A portable amplifier.

Tested alone with Dragonfly, the result was interesting, the little red devil being able to infuse energy into the headphones. Overall they sounded very engaging and fun, but the sound was a little grainy and lost in terms of clarity / transparency.

 

The surprise came in when I have paired Dragonfly Red with Aune B1 as amplifier. I was floored by the level of transparency/clarity this combo was capable of. It actually fixed some of the lower midrange dip issue.

Today I have also tested them on the street in a noisy environment. I actually used them while going home from the office, 4 km walk through the center of Bucharest (really crowded place at that hour). The isolation was really good and I was able to enjoy the music very well. In this situation, I can’t really say I cared about the W signature any longer. I think that the peak on the upper midrange actually helped in the noisy environment.

Medium Review 

SOUND

I used the “bass enhanced” silicone tips for most of my listening. These tips provided the best seal of the included assortment, but I felt I never got a perfect seal with any of the stock tips because of the shallow fit of the IEM. I would strongly recommend using a tip like the SpinFit CP240 with these.

The FH5 has a mild w-shaped sound signature with elevated sub-bass, warm but less prominent mid-bass, slightly forward mids (especially upper mids), and a relaxed treble that is present but smooth.

Sub-bass extension is excellent. Mid-bass has adequate slam on tracks that demand it, but is controlled and not overpowering. Bass articulation is very good. Bass is very textured. The bass does not bleed into the lower midrange. Mids as a whole are a bit forward for my tastes. Male vocals are less elevated than female vocals. Mids have presence without being abrasive. Lower treble is detailed but not amazingly so, and lacks sparkle compared to more V-shaped IEMs. Upper treble is rolled off.

The soundstage is intimate, but imaging and instrument separation are superb.

Hear.Reviews

FIT / COMFORT / ISOLATION

Isolation is generally average for a Hybrid IEM (you will always likely get some form of external noise through the bass port in a high noise environment). It does ultimately depend on tip choice and seal. I have used these on our suburban streets and the isolation is pretty good – but I did try on a flight a couple of weeks ago, and for me personally it was not strong enough to isolate the noise of the aircraft engines – especially with my normal low listening levels.

Everydaylistening Review 

Sound –

Tonality –

The FH5 is a W-shaped earphone, forgoing the brighter sound of the F9 earphones and instead adopting the fuller and more bass-focused voicing of the cheaper FH1 before it.

What makes the FH5 quite interesting is its combination of a natural, often surprisingly close to neutral tone set to a very smooth, dense midrange. It achieves this not through enhancing the bass or lower-midrange but through sharp attenuation just before the lower-treble combined with a focus on sub over mid-bass; so its tone is not especially warm.

A notable centre midrange bump redeems vocal presence in the face of its slightly more energetic lower-treble and voluminous sub-bass thereby producing a sound that is very engaging but also relatively balanced overall.

Ear Tips –

The FH5 includes 4 types of ear tips that slightly alter the sound to user taste. The vocal tips offer a slightly brighter sound, delivering greater upper-midrange and lower-treble presence.

This bolsters clarity and also detail presence, however, the tips are actually less detailed as treble becomes slightly more brittle.

Meanwhile, the bass tips offer quite the opposite effect, offering a darker, warmer sound by attenuating the higher frequencies, chiefly, the upper-midrange.

The foam tips also offer a slightly warmer sound, treble is further attenuated and bass becomes a touch soft and congested. They aren’t ideal sonically but do aid isolation and fit so they have a purpose. All sound comments are using the balanced tips that I found to offer the most versatile presentation.

Accessibleaudio Review 

Tips, tips, and more tips

Bass tips

They are definitely a millimetre or two wider than the balanced tips, and I noticed that not only was the material of the bore a little stiffer, the size of the bore was also wider than that of the Balanced or the Vocal tips. Bass response was instantly stronger and warmer, and I felt that it did help to calm down some of the midhigh harshness I experienced in some of the rock and EDM tracks I tested in addition to giving stronger bass impact and subbass rumble.

Vocal

For some reason this tip was incredibly hard to push down to the end of the nozzle. Perhaps the bore material is even stiffer than the Bass tips’. With these tips, the difference was a little subtler than the contrast between Bass and Balanced tips. Vocals seemed just marginally brighter and more forward, without compromising bass response and other frequencies.

Justpushstart Review 

When putting them on, the headphones loop around your ear offering a secure connection. I had no issues doing my daily tasks with them on and having them fall out or even move around. However, after a couple hours there was some minor fatigue.

The biggest difference between FH5 and lesser earbuds is how sound is presented and separated. A lot of the earbuds I had laying around were flat, with FH5 being giving each sound the stage it needs. Even when compared to some of the lower end headphones I had, such as Surge 3D or Trustmaster’s offerings, they offered a more immersive experience. In fact, I enjoyed them so much I found myself using them over a gaming headset.

Outside of missing a microphone, they had enough of a sound stage to get immersed in whatever world I was in, be it Destiny or just The Princess Guide. If nothing else, the ability to play without having something large and bulky on my head for offline or situations where I don’t need to talk is a massive plus. 

Audiophile-heaven Review 

Sound Quality

The sonic signature of fiiO FH5 is slightly different from the FiiO IEM House Sound we’re used to from F9 and F9Pro. If you had either, you need to forget everything about their sound before imagining how FH5 sounds like, because FiiO redesigned the sound from the ground up. 

The sonic signature can be generally described as mildly V-shaped, or rather W-shaped, since the sub-bass has a good amount of emphasis, then it gets to a lower point around 600 Hz, after which it gets a bit of an enhanced area around the midrange, after which it gets stronger in the treble, leading to what can be considered a fairly natural overall presentation. Since the midrange is not exactly backwards, many will feel that FH5 is a little midrange-forward, at least compared to a true V-shaped IEM like F9Pro, but in all fairness, both the sub-bass and the treble make enough of a presence to balance the overall signature well. 

Starting with the bass, most of the focus is in the sub-bass, with a powerful and quick slam, fast speed, yet large size for impact. FH5 is able to resolve finer textures fairly well, especially useful for metal music, where speed is important in the bass. The mid-bass is still fairly enhanced compared to the lower midrange, so the bass feels pretty warm yet quick, on an overall level. 

Themrphone Review 

FiiO FH5: Box Contents And Design

You will be gobsmacked by the contents inside the FH5’s intensely dense packaging. FiiO pulls no stops here. You get everything inside the box including two different carry cases – a soft silicon pouch and a hard case!

That’s not it, FiiO has also included a smattering of foam and silicon ear tips. And interestingly, the silicon ear tips are individually tuned for three different signatures – balanced, vocal, and bass. To be honest, I was not a fan of the sound through the foam tips inside the box. This is weird because I generally love the dark, the more bass-heavy sound you get with foam tips in general.  

I stuck to the balanced tips, and that works because there is no discernible difference in sound signature with the vocal and bass tips. Wait, there’s also a cleaning brush for times when you want to share your IEMs with someone else. Unimportant personal information for no reason at all: I hate sharing my IEMs.

The collectibles review

In recent times, FiiO has been working to broaden their portfolio to incorporate a variety of IEMs. The brand new FH5 ($259) is their most formidable design thus far, and has taken the place of the flagship of their rising lineup.

The FH5 is a Four-driver hybrid design with a 10mm polymer nanocomposite dynamic driver dealing with the low frequencies, a Knowles ED30262 balanced armature handing the midrange, and a pair of Knowles 31082 balanced armatures to deal with the treble and extremely excessive frequency treble. These are contained in a stupendous precision-machined alloy shell that gives top-of-the-line ergonomic matches of any common shell I’ve encountered (extra on that later).

Whereas $259 is a particularly accessible worth level, relative to most corporations’ flagship IEMs, it’s definitely a daring step up for a worth pushed firm like FiiO, so it caught my curiosity. And I’m pleased to say the FH5 most undoubtedly continues FiiO’s custom of delivering strong bang-for-buck merchandise.  From the second I first opened the field, might inform the humbly-priced FH5 was going to over ship, massive time.

Youtube Review 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ue2KBsA2aAE (Currawong, 10K followers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AS6v5y_4ehM (Bad Guy Good Audio Reviews, 14K followers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a94aPildayk (Steve Guttenberg Audiophiliac, 55K followers)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1_wMQhIfVr4 ( Porta.Fi, 18K followers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZRB5QMIHgrM ( Major hifi, 2.7k followers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MZUvPQ6SN5I&t=47s ( Pocketnow, 1.7M followers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXJ4UTSJw2Q ( Najam Reviews, 1.8K followers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4bxD7i9iNsM ( FiiO FH5 v.s. NCM5 v2 ) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Bm653Is0g38&t=81s ( SupraPixel, 868K followers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jn7uUQDKzbU ( Porta.fi, Russian, 18K folowers) 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=O8p0HpTgODA ( Z review, 147K followers)